Breeds

Welsh Terrier

GROUP 2 - TERRIERS

History

The Welsh Terrier (Welsh: Daeargi Cymreig) originates from Wales and was originally bred for hunting fox, rodents and badger, but during the last century it has mainly been bred for showing. Despite this, it has retained its terrier strength of character. (1)

Appearance

The Welsh Terrier is colored tan on the head, legs and underbelly while having a black or sometimes grizzle saddle. This is not always the case with female terriers as they are sometimes a simple darker tan all over. The breed is a sturdy and compact dog of about medium size.

The hair contains two layers, an undercoat that insulates and an abrasive fur on top that protects against dirt, rain, and wind. Welsh Terriers are born mostly all black and during the first year they change the color to standard black and tan grizzle. 

This breed does not shed, however, the coat requires regular maintenance including brushing and hand stripping. (1)

Temperament & Suitability

The Welsh Terrier has a typical terrier temperament. In the right hands, it is a happy, lively, and seldom shy or timid dog, but sometimes can have an attitude. The Welsh Terrier is generally friendly with people and dogs but when a challenge is perceived, it will not back down. Dogs of this breed can be devoted friends and can function either as city dogs or as country dogs. 

Welsh Terriers were developed to hunt independently and this required that they be very assertive and stoic dogs. As a consequence, developing obedience in a Welsh Terrier is a long-term proposition and one has to constantly work on and reinforce the training.

When acting on their own, they are quite creative and quick in decision making. They also have the potential for excessive barking. Like other terrier breeds, the Welsh Terrier enjoys digging.

A Welsh Terrier is full of energy and requires regular exercise. A run around the yard during the day is insufficient. They become excited, and if bored, they may explore and potentially cause mischief and damage. Welsh Terriers need a challenge to keep them entertained. For example, they love chasing toys and love swimming (a good example would be lake activities with their families). 

Welsh Terriers get along well with children; they love to play and follow a child as it plays, however, and they will often tug at pant legs and can knock young ones off their feet. If they are around young children at an early age, they will easily learn to play more gently.

As with all breeds, it is important to socialise Welsh Terriers as early as possible to a wide range of dogs, people, and experiences. (1)

Sizes

Height: not exceeding 39 cms (15.5 ins) at shoulders

Weight: 9-9.5 kg (20-21 lbs) (2)

In Conclusion

Now you know a little about the Welsh Terrier and have decided this is the dog for you, or you would like more information, please make contact with the breed club or your State controlling body for purebred dogs. They will be able to give you information about available puppies and also suggest dog shows where you can see the breed and speak to breeders. In this way you will gain a better perspective of the Welsh Terrier and its needs and whether this breed would suit your lifestyle.

References

  1. Wikipedia.org
  2. Ankc.org.au
    Photo: Shutterstock.com

Breeders

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